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Stereotypes: A Big Problem in Our Modern Society

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❶But according to this study, others commonly perceive them this way.

What Stereotypes Are

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Essay on Stereotypes

Good stereotypes can also be harmful and cause new problems. They are even worse because people are not aware they are causing harm. This can be harmful to many individuals.

Burkeman argument is based in a study by the Duke University that discovered that positive stereotypes can be harmful in different situations without people realizing they are doing so. In this study the participants were exposed to fake articles related to black people.

The first article was positive and showed that black people are better at sports. Next the participants were exposed to a negative article about that black people are more prone to violence.

This demonstrates how good and bad stereotypes are equally bad because it causes prejudgment and leads to bigger problems. Stereotypes create a misconception of how people are and how they live in other cultures, religions, or countries. This misconception could cause problems such as discrimination.

This is a big problem in our multicultural society. She uses the example of when she first came to the US to study. She says that a woman felt sorry about her because she came from Africa, and even ask her if she could listen her tribal music.

This demonstrates how people are influenced by a single story of a country or a person, and are no aware of many other stories that could change the perception of them. What if my roommate knew about the heart procedure that was performed in the Lagos hospital last week? What if my roommate knew about contemporary Nigerian music, talented people singing in English and Pidgin, and Igbo and Yoruba and Ijo, mixing influences from Jay-Z to Fela to Bob Marley to their grandfathers.

What if we see in other countries, cultures, or religions not only what we belief, but also other stories that could change our perception. It is important to learn from each other to understand and avoid stereotypes that could be harmful. Stereotypes are creating problems in kids. These problems can affect children in many ways. We can see the negatives effects in many areas such as the academic area.

He support his claim based on a study of the University of Berkeley that shows how racial stereotypes make the children perform poorly in school. He mentions how we could solve these problems.

If we want new generations to be successful we need to do something to change it. Stereotypes also are creating a false idea of how they interact with other individuals. Many of the stereotypes the children receive are through media. It is also important to teach our children to respect each other regardless of sex, sexual orientation, race, culture, religion, personality and more. It is important to teach them these values because they are the future of our society.

The key to reversing negative stereotypes is to contradict them, in direct interactions between people, in the media, and through education. Once people get to know a person from "the other side," they often will determine that the other is not nearly as bad as they originally had assumed.

Though sometimes they might find out they are just as bad -- or even worse! More often, however, people really are much more reasonable than their stereotypes would suggest. In that case, getting to know people personally helps to break down negative images. This is especially true when people determine that they actually have things in common with people from the other side. Such things can range from enjoying the same music, hobbies, or sports, to having the same worries about children or aging parents.

Even when people learn that they share fear or sadness, they can begin to understand each other more. When they come to understand that the other is afraid of being hurt, or losing a loved one in war, just as they are, that brings people together. Such shared emotions make people seem human, while stereotypes typically " dehumanize " people. Likewise, shared emotions make empathy possible, which opens the door to new forms of interaction and trust building , at least among the individuals involved.

Depending on the context and other interactions, the image of the group as a whole may become more positive as well. At other times, people rationalize that their one new acquaintance is "not like the others. The challenge then is to expand such transformative experiences beyond the individuals involved to larger groups, communities, and eventually whole societies. Developing such mutual understanding is the goal of many intervention efforts in war-torn areas, and in places rocked by social unrest.

Dialogue groups and problem-solving workshops are two common ways of doing this. So are joint projects such as war-reconstruction efforts, children's programs, recreational programs, medical programs -- any kind of program that brings individuals from opposing groups together in a cooperative venture.

Although they have additional goals beyond the breaking of stereotypes, working together cooperatively can do much to break down negative images people hold of the "enemy. The media also plays an important role in both perpetuating and in breaking down stereotypes. If they characterize particular groups of people in certain ways, their viewers or readers are likely to do the same.

So if a movie -- or the motion picture industry in general -- characterizes a group of people negatively, they are likely to be perpetuating negative stereotypes and making conflicts worse. If they emphasize the positive aspects of groups that contradict prevalent stereotypes, they can have a significant role in building mutual understanding.

Educational institutions and teaching materials also have the opportunity to affect stereotypes, and hence influence inter-group relations. Efforts to teach about different cultures, and the history of different racial or ethnic groups can help build inter-group understanding if it is done in an effective and sympathetic way.

However, the opposite is also true. If textbooks teach about the treachery and villainous actions of the enemy, this, obviously, will only perpetuate stereotypes from one generation to the next, entrenching the conflict for many years to come. This does not mean that history should be ignored. The holocaust, for example, did occur and must be acknowledged. But it can be acknowledged as a grave mistake that is now recognized as a mistake, rather than painted as "typical" or "acceptable" behavior.

Changing stereotypes is largely the job of individuals. Each of us should examine the assumptions that we make about others and ask ourselves where those assumptions come from. Upon what information are they based? Are they based on personal experiences with others? Might "the other" be different in different situations? Are your assumptions based on things you have heard from others? Learned from the TV or movies?

Is it possible that some of your negative images are wrong -- at least for some people? In most cases, the answer to that last question is likely to be "yes. Most groups have moderates and extremists , people who are willing to listen and work with the other side, and those who are not.

Rather than assuming all of "the enemy" are evil and unwilling to hear your concerns, try to get to know people as individuals. Just as that will reduce the stereotypes you hold of others, it is also likely to reduce the stereotypes others hold of you. Steps the media can take to reduce stereotypes are dealt with elsewhere in this system, but fundamentally, it is important that the media paint as accurate a picture of both sides of a conflict as is possible. This generally means painting a complex picture.

While extremists tend to make the most noise and hence the most news, the media can do much to lessen conflict by focusing attention on moderates and peacebuilders as well. Heartwarming stories of reconciliation can replace or at least stand side-by-side with heart-wrenching stories of violence and loss.

Showing that there is hope -- helping people visualize a better life in a better world -- is a service the media can do better than any other institution, at least on a large scale. This, too, is dealt with elsewhere in this system, but the educational system teachers, schools, textbooks needs to also try to paint a fair and accurate picture of the conflict and the different people involved, being aware that different sides of a conflict will view frame what is happening very differently.

Through stories, discussions, and exercises, teachers can help students of all ages and levels understand the complexity of the conflicts that surround them, and develop age- and situation-appropriate responses to the current conflicts in their homes, communities, and nations.

To the extent that classrooms contain students from both sides of the conflict, teachers can help students learn to understand and appreciate each other better, while protecting the safety physical and emotional of those on both sides. If the classroom only contains one group, reaching such intergroup understandings is harder, but still worth the effort through books and articles, discussions, TV and movies, and when available, online exercises such as those provided in the links below.

The same dynamics appears in almost all escalated conflicts, and if allowed to go to far, results in catastrophe. Before and during the Rwandan genocide, Tutsi's were referred to as "cockroaches" "rats," and "enemies. One hopes that the U. We saw it with respect to Mexicans during Trump's campaign, where he accused them of being criminals and rapists. Both groups now are under siege, Mexicans and other undocumented immigrants fearing deportation daily, and Muslims increasingly being attacked and even killed for their relgious beliefs.

It's time to turn this pathology around.


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Stereotypes: A Big Problem in Our Modern Society. I personally hate stereotypes. I dislike the fact that people think I should act one way because of my sex, personality, or nationality.

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Free Stereotyping papers, essays, and research papers. Stereotyping - Stereotyping Stereotyping is a form of pre judgement that is as prevalent in today's society as it was years ago. Stereotyping is taking a description of an individual and applying it to a group as a. The media has the power to stereotype and to change the views of its audience/5(10).